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Thread: Is it possible for someone to use these methods in real life?

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    N3wb
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    Default Is it possible for someone to use these methods in real life?

    Is it possible for someone to use some method from Detective Conan in real life? Also, how does the writer make up all these ingenious plots? (inb4 he's a loose serial murderer).

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    Yes you can, that's what it's all about with the Mystery genre, actually. But it's just the tricks, you can't really expect other people to act the way you want to, usually, so it's no problem.
    The mangaka just has large amount of knowledge of one thing after another. And obviously he also has inspired from the great writers like Agatha Christie and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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    One of The Followers
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    A lot of these won't work (a few of them are physically impossible or at least highly questionable, but for most of them the reason is that it expects people to behave exactly according to a script). Naturally a few of those would actually work if you tried them (but cold blooded murder is the rarest kind of killing, and few of the people who perform it actually have the composure and creativity to come up with such ideas).

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    Otaku ukatO keenchaos's Avatar
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    Are you planning to murder someone, hmm?

    I think most of them wouldn't work. Some tricks are really risky to try, requires you to be way too lucky for every single detail to go according to plan.

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    Has a Few Faves stalksin's Avatar
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    Murder isn't usually something that is planned. It is something that happens on the spur of the moment.

    Detective Conan paints a really dark world if you think about it. Japan has the lowest crime rate in the world, but one of the highest suicide rates...........................

    Sometimes I feel like the manga is suggesting that the murders Conan doesn't run into are simply passed off as "suicide".

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    Obsidian Deluder fanged_loathe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kaitou_ View Post
    Is it possible for someone to use some method from Detective Conan in real life? Also, how does the writer make up all these ingenious plots? (inb4 he's a loose serial murderer).
    Many only work in a specific situation - for example, the Mystery Train case only works if there's nothing suspicious about requesting a specific cabin, like you repeatedly request this cabin simply because you don't like change or some other reason and becomes pattern behavior; any other circumstance, then it becomes highly suspect - but otherwise, yes, they are applicable to the real world. Due to the more pedestrian nature of this series, Aoyama doesn't touch upon the psychological aspects of his cases and leaves forensic science to only establish time and method of death even when there's no excuse for this staggering halt to Shinichi's biggest enemy, but the tricks are sound in their own particular environment. However, saying they don't work at all is the same as saying Alexander Litvinenko and Georgi Markov weren't murdered - they were killed through a plan designed around their predictability.

    Creativity isn't necessary, it's all been done before, one needs only to study the past. The Demon Dog was Hound of the Baskervilles in terms of the hound itself, Aoyama only substituted the cover on the dog with something more modern and much more intimidating. The only reason these tricks aren't used more often in the real world goes more to something Aoyama touched upon in Shinichi's First Love: the more complicated the trick, the more evidence left behind. Truthfully, it's in a criminal's best interest to not employ one of these tricks and simply find ways to destroy the evidence - it becomes an obvious murder, but at the same time there's no evidence connecting the criminal to the crime itself, forcing the police to break it in interrogation for a confession, and a lawyer not only deals with those techniques but also offers salvation for the urge to confess. About the only useful tricks they can draw from Aoyama are the distraction techniques such as fake dying messages implicating the real killer and the when Ayumi was kidnapped to cover the theft of a rug (preferably not in such an obvious manner). While leaving evidence, they lead the investigators in the wrong direction, allowing the criminal ample time to get out of the hot zone.

    It should be noted that the above hasn't stopped killers completely. Richard Kukinski, a contract killer, was fond of storing bodies in freezer before dumping them in order to throw off the time of death, and he got away with it long enough to earn the nickname "Iceman." However, some accounts say that this was also how they caught on to him - apparently, one of his victims hadn't thawed completely before being found. In due credit, Kukilinski was also an admirer of cyanide since it was hard to detect and killed quickly; and during his early years when he lived in New Jersey he specifically targeted homeless people of New York knowing that their lack of family meant there was a smaller chance of getting caught, allowing him to practice safely and let time destroy the evidence for him. In other words, even one of the great killers of history wasn't totally invested in a trick and worked primarily on obliterating any connection to the crime.
    Last edited by fanged_loathe; 01-08-2013 at 11:33 AM.
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    Has a Few Faves someone123's Avatar
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    Aoyama Gosho sure knows how to kill people!!

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    A Page Flipper dudewththatsMYmanga's Avatar
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    @stalksin Actually a murder CAN be planned out, it's called premeditated or something like that? Like you said, there's muder where it's the spur of the moment or it can be planned by someone like in most of the cases in these series, though i doubt they'll be as elaborate as the ones shown in this series

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    Posting Phantom kei1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dudewththatsMYmanga View Post
    @stalksin Actually a murder CAN be planned out, it's called premeditated or something like that? Like you said, there's muder where it's the spur of the moment or it can be planned by someone like in most of the cases in these series, though i doubt they'll be as elaborate as the ones shown in this series
    Was it pre-determined? anyway I guess the murders in real life that happen on spur of moment after they realise what they've done they can't plan anything more, instant shock and they run away and be scared and think of any evidence they left to the scene and are too scared to go collect or clean the place because "the culprit always returns to the crime scene" or something, too afraid to get caught

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    Quote Originally Posted by fanged_loathe View Post
    It should be noted that the above hasn't stopped killers completely. Richard Kukinski, a contract killer, was fond of storing bodies in freezer before dumping them in order to throw off the time of death, and he got away with it long enough to earn the nickname "Iceman." However, some accounts say that this was also how they caught on to him - apparently, one of his victims hadn't thawed completely before being found. In due credit, Kukilinski was also an admirer of cyanide since it was hard to detect and killed quickly; and during his early years when he lived in New Jersey he specifically targeted homeless people of New York knowing that their lack of family meant there was a smaller chance of getting caught, allowing him to practice safely and let time destroy the evidence for him. In other words, even one of the great killers of history wasn't totally invested in a trick and worked primarily on obliterating any connection to the crime.
    Gosh thanks for sharing this bit of history. interesting read on wiki. but so sick.

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